Head Styles

Screws and Bolts have a head style that is particular to it's intended purpose. Below is a basic guide to screw head styles and their common uses.

  • 82 Deg Flat Head

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    Supplied to standard dimensions with and 80 deg. and 82 deg. Angle to be used where finished surfaces require a flush fastening unit. The countersunk portion offer good centering possibilities.

  • 82 Deg. Oval U/C Head

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    This is the standard oval head 80 deg. to 82 deg. countersunk screw with the lower one-third of the countersunk portion removed to facilitate production of extremely short lengths. As illustrated, it will fit a standard counter-bore hole and is particularly adaptable flush assemblies in thin stock.

  • 90-100 Deg Oval U/C Head

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    This is the standard oval head 90 deg. to 100 deg. countersunk screw with the lower one-third of the countersunk portion removed to facilitate production of extremely short lengths. As illustrated, it will fit a standard counter-bore hole and is particularly adaptable flush assemblies in thin stock.

  • Fillister Head

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    The standard oval fillister head has a smaller diameter than the round head, but is higher with a correspondingly deeper slot The smaller diameter head increase the pressure applied on the smaller area and can be assembled close to flange and raised surfaces. Headed in counter-bore dies to ensure concentricity, they may be used successfully in counter-bore holes.

  • 82 Deg. Oval Head

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    Fully specified as “oval countersunk”, this head is identical to the standard flat head, but possesses, in addition, a rounded, neat appearing upper surface for attractiveness of design.

  • 90-100 Deg Flat Head

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    This is the standard oval head 80 deg. to 82 deg. countersunk screw with the lower one-third of the countersunk portion removed to facilitate production of extremely short lengths. As illustrated, it will fit a standard counter-bore hole and is particularly adaptable flush assemblies in thin stock.

  • Binder Head

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    Generally used in electrical and radio work because of its identifying undercut beneath the head, which binds and eliminates the fraying of stranded wire. Offers and attractively designed, medium-low head with ordinarily sufficient bearing surface. Not ordinarily recommended as a Phillips recessed head.

  • Indented Hex

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    An inexpensive wrench head fastener made to standard hexagon head dimensions. The hex is completely cold upset in a counter-bore die and possesses an identifying depression in the top surface of the head.

  • Bugle Head

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    Specialized screw with a bugle head that is designed to attach drywall to wood or metal studs, A versatile construction fastener with many uses. The diameter of drywall screw threads is larger than the shaft diameter. Similar to countersunk, but a smooth progression from the shaft to the angle of the head, similar to the bell of a bugle.

  • Pan Head

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    Recommended for new designs to replace round, truss and binding heads. Provides low large diameter head, but with characteristically high outer edge along the outer periphery of the head where driving action is most effective for high tightening torques. Slightly different head contour where supplied with recessed head.

All the information provided in this section has been assembled with concern for accuracy. It is intended for advisory purposes only and use of this information is completely voluntary. We do not guarantee its completeness or validity and assume no responsibility for any loss, claims or damages resulting from use or application of this information. All information is subject to change without prior notice.